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[icon] Check out the dishmaker - Patti
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Subject:Check out the dishmaker
Time:02:04 am


I want!
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njchick
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Time:2007-04-08 11:58 am (UTC)
fuck the dishmaker. i want the guy in the infomercial.
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violet_tigress1
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Time:2007-04-08 07:10 pm (UTC)
I want both.
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luckylefty
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Time:2007-04-08 12:45 pm (UTC)
A cool idea, but it seems like it must be pretty energy-inefficient.
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foomf
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Time:2007-04-08 03:40 pm (UTC)
Really intriguing idea, but they need to apply some use analysis to this.

Dishes - the things you eat off in daily life - are more than just shapes to hold food. Ideally they're also art, they are beautiful in their own right. They're design ideas. But say that you personally like the idea of a colorful, transparent acrylic, and find it pleasant to eat from.

Their idea is basically object-oriented dishware.
The machine they showed has three slots for three different sizes of disk.
Those are used to make small plates or bowls, large plates or bowls, and drinking glasses. No cups; the system doesn't provide for handles, unless you have a pre-formed handle that you slot your cup into, which goes against the idea of recyclable, oh well.

This is fine, but here's some unfinished design: it's not necessarily day-to-day plates that people need. It's the special occasion things like big serving bowls, gravy boats, devilled egg trays, oval roast trays, wine glasses, demitasse cups, and so on. Those are what you don't want to store, that you want to fabricate at need. And, for a fancy formal party, you want china, not acrylic.

But, back to daily use.

Your dishes will always be identical, so if you like the shapes they provide, all is good; a new shape won't be just downloaded because it uses a shaped die mold; you'd probably have to buy them, although they aren't going to be that expensive. They might come up with a variable-rod shaping system but that's going to be much more expensive and trouble-prone, and I don't see it being more cost-effective than getting a fixed mold. You might have a selection of molds that you put in for special occasions.

The material is always the same color and transparency; if you want a pattern or a more complex color scheme, this version won't support it.
Maybe a next-generation version will let you print designs onto a vinyl disk and layer it into the dish when it's being formed.

You might even have many colors, and some non-transparent, just because you like them. And, let's go further and say that you don't eat steak or other things you have to cut on your plate very often, so we can ignore the problem of scarring the surface of the acrylic in a way that won't heal in the 'recycle' stage.

So, the idea is that you don't need to have a cupboard to store them, but you still need your dishwasher or to hand-wash them, because any food residue is going to become stinky and/or chemically bond with the material.

Since (as has been mentioned) this process is energy intensive, you might choose to save on electricity and waste-heat by only changing your dishes once a week, in order to keep the memory plastic from becoming amnesiac.

Your cupboards will be reduced or re-purposed to pantry use and for only the small number of cups and dishes that you do want to keep.

The unit itself takes up the space of a dishwasher, or a big cupboard.
A lower-cupboard space is usually where pots and pans are kept, and you'd lose that, but if you have a lower cupboard for pantry use that can be reclaimed from an upper cupboard. No net gain, no net loss.

At this point, it's mostly a really nifty gadget, and while I'm not against gadgets for the sake of gadgetry, I'm still skeptical. What are the ongoing costs? How well does the acrylic work with hot foods, say, a nice hot soup? Is your bowl going to schlump while you're eating from it?

So they have a good beginning ... might be a really useful thing for a church, an elder-care residence, or a soup kitchen, especially one that operates out of a truck.
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foomf
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-04-10 06:16 am (UTC)
True... but if someone puts a glass or cup with water into the microwave, and nukes it, then it's entirely possible to get to around that range. That's the same superheating phenomenon that you find with mcDonald's coffee :)

I'm more concerned with food right out of ovens or pans, or stuff being re-heated.
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dkuznick
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-04-11 08:37 pm (UTC)
I keep waiting for William Finley to show up, fall into it and burn his face off, while Paul Williams laughs his ass off.

But I am strange that way.
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[icon] Check out the dishmaker - Patti
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