?

Log in

No account? Create an account

[icon] I did WHAT? - Patti
View:Recent Entries.
View:Archive.
View:Friends.
View:Profile.
View:Website (pattib.org).

Tags:
Security:
Subject:I did WHAT?
Time:12:35 am
I just got back from the gym.

As you may recall, the normal week 4 is five minute warmup walk, three minute run, 1.5 minute walk, five minute run, 2.5 minute walk, three minute run, 1.5 minute walk, five minute run, five minute cooldown walk. This particular workout has been severely kicking my ass, so I've been adding more time to the walks. Tonight went like this:

Warmup walk, three minute run. OK, I'm tired, and a 90-second walk isn't going to do it-- I'll do two minutes.

Five minute run. ARGH, this sucks. Man, how can people do this? This is the most boring thing I can imagine doing. Push push, I want to quit, but I'm too stubborn, but man do I want to quit. Man, that chick next to me has a great ass. OK, only a minute left. Nice rack too. Plod, plod, yawn, OK, five minutes is up, thank god. Three minute walk.

Three minute run. OK, three minutes doesn't entirely suck. It's dull, but it takes about two and a half minutes for me to get well and truly bored, so I can do this. Three minute walk, because my heart rate wasn't quite down to where I wanted it to be after two.

Five minute run. Hate this. Hate hate hate. Oh man, the chick with the rack quit already, and she looked like she was about to die after running for two minutes. Wimp. Wait, why do I do this to myself? This running thing sucks. Three minutes down, two to go. I need a nap. Run run run. I'll check my heart rate to break up the monotony. The Knight Rider animation on the monitor is cute. OK, heart rate of 144... about what I expected, and pretty close to the top of where I want to be. Man, this is boring. Only a minute to go... that's 70 steps to count, roughly. Ten, twenty.

OK, I've done five minutes. Hmm. I wonder if I can do one more? I'll try it. 60, 65, 70, wow, I can. Maybe another one?

60, 65, 70, holy crap. I've run for seven straight minutes. Can I do eight?

OK, this is still boring. Let's check my heart rate. Hrmm. OK, 147, holding steady. I'm not dead yet. 60, 65, 70, eight fucking minutes. WHOA!

Heart rate is holding steady in the high 140s. Let's keep going. Man, this is dull, but I can do one more minute. 60, 65, 70. NINE!

Nine. That's not a round number. Ten is a round number. I think I'm still alive, my heart rate is 146, do it. Do it. Still bored, though. Oooh, that guy has a nice tattoo. Plod plod plod. 30 seconds left. 20. 10. Get ready to reach for the speed dial.

JAYZUS KEERIST! I JUST RAN NONSTOP FOR TEN MINUTES! TEN FUCKING MINUTES!


So I don't really know what to make of this. I'm pretty sure that if I'd set out to do ten minutes I would have failed miserably-- it's too big a chunk of time for my brain to cope with, and I don't see enough mental progress bars to make myself keep going. But I could slippery slope my way into it.

I listened to music this time rather than This American Life, which may have helped. I don't know for sure, but maybe it distracts a different part of my brain. Most of the run still felt pretty sucky, though, like I really had to force myself through it. It didn't feel good. And I'm pretty sure I still couldn't really do a W4Dx without modification.

Maybe I'm getting better, though. I felt significantly less dead at the end of this run than after the last one.

And I'm working on getting a new controller board for the treadmill.
comments: Leave a comment Previous Entry Share Next Entry


rightkindofme
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-16 08:41 am (UTC)
The first time I ran five miles in an hour I was so happy that I bounced (very slowly) for quite a while. I haven't done it since. I want to do that again. :)
(Reply) (Thread)


adb_jaeger
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-16 01:02 pm (UTC)
I listened to music this time rather than This American Life, which may have helped.

I find when I listen to music, I need to be careful not to go to quickly if the music has a quick(er), steady beat.
(Reply) (Thread)

songmonk
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-16 04:27 pm (UTC)
Heh, from the way you describe it, it sounds like it's not your heart that will kill you on longer runs; it's boredom. :-)
(Reply) (Thread)


chrishartman
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-16 05:36 pm (UTC)
Congratulations! I find music works great for that sort of thing too. But that makes the boredom problem even worse, of course.
(Reply) (Thread)


ronsrants
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-18 03:18 am (UTC)
Patti,

I've been giving this some serious thought. Here's what I've got:

1) The first issue is repetition. I'm starting to believe that the more frequently you repeat the running, the easier it gets for your mind to adjust and snap into that Zen/happy place. I've been going on 3 years and was discussing your problem with my running buddy who is about to celebrate 1yr C25k anniversary and I realized that I've kind of forgotten how hard/boring initial training can be.

I'm not suggesting you go off program and run more frequently(quite the opposite), but I think if you stick with it and get to those longer runs, eventually you will find a grove and start craving that running time. It's kind of like subspace, but for runners.

2) My running buddy points out that running solo is boring and suggests you find a running buddy.

3) I know you love the treadmill in a way that I find appalling. My experience on a treadmill was that it sucked. I hated having to concentrate on being centered (and not slipping/falling) but more importantly having the readout with the laps, clock, etc. really distracted me. In a bad way. I never found myself able to just relax into the run and let myself go. Instead, I was constantly checking the clock or the distance (depending on what my personal goal was) and counting down to the end. Mentally it made my run painful, boring, and just not fun at all.

I admit that you are still in the middle of C25k, so you have to spend a certain amount of attention on the intervals, but I can't help and wonder if that is why it seems so boring to you?

-R
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)


whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-18 03:31 am (UTC)
I think my issue is just the opposite of (3).

My brain needs small slices of progress and small markers of progress in order to be able to keep going. It needs to constantly count and measure things. Without that, a big task (like running for more than a very short period of time) seems insurmountable, and I give up too easily.

Running outside would be worse, because I would just perceive a large distance in front of me without the constant tick tick tick of metrics to show progress. Without paying attention to short intervals, it would be even MORE boring.

I think the problem that I'm running into is that five minutes is too big a chunk for my brain to tear apart. I'm going to have to find a way around that.

Amusing, and possibly relevant: I count steps when I run. I know exactly how many steps I run in a minute, and at the start of each running segment I calculate the total for that run. Then, along the way, I give myself percentage progress updates. "OK, 70 steps. That's 20%." The clock is the final arbiter, but my count is rarely off by more than 5%.

Oh, and P.S. The word subspace is one of my hot buttons, but I'll tell you about that another time.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)


chrishartman
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-18 07:17 am (UTC)
I'm a lot like you are, constantly calculating "how much farther am I going to go now" and "how much longer do I plan on running." But, while I don't mind the treadmill or elliptical, I find running on the nice trails we have here *much* more satisfying. Now, maybe that's hard for you - from what you've described, running on pavement and worrying about (human) predators would certainly be no fun. But here in Fairbanks (during the summer months) I can run on a trail that's more beautiful than most scenery photographs you'll ever see, in a climate that's as comfortable as any gym. I think the psychological benefits of seeing trees rushing past are significant. (I believe there have been studies about this, but I'm too lazy to look them up now.)

Additionally, I have a wristwatch GPS, so I can be compulsive about how far I've gone, whether it's time to take another drink of water, and how much longer I should push.

I should probable mention that I run a lot further/harder than you do, but I don't think that makes any difference in what we're discussing.

Re-reading what I'm responding to, I think the main difference is where you say "I would just perceive a large distance in front of me without the constant tick tick tick of metrics to show progress. Without paying attention to short intervals, it would be even MORE boring." Running on a trail doesn't have "a large distance in front of [you]." It's all about "can I get up this next hill", or "I'll walk until I cross the road, and then run until the end of the next song on the ipod."

To make this response even longer than it already is, I'll revisit the music vs podcast discussion. As I said, I get bored while running too. I usually listen to podcasts or audio books. But when I get discouraged - "I can't run another 3 miles, but I want to run 10 today, and I'm only at 7"; well, for some reason, switching to inspiring music (some we share might be Queen or showtunes) - well, heck, all of the sudden I'm bored but running strong!
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)


whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-18 08:00 am (UTC)
You absolutely run a lot farther/harder than I do. You also are carrying around a lot less of an ass than I am, are in better shape, are younger, and have a lot more experience running. I may well be working harder at it. :-)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)


ronsrants
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-18 09:13 am (UTC)
Weird, but to each their own.

-R
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

loser_variable
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-12-17 12:08 am (UTC)
"Heart rate is holding steady in the high 140s. Let's keep going."

I smell a tipping point approaching. Exxxxxxxxxxcellent.
(Reply) (Thread)

[icon] I did WHAT? - Patti
View:Recent Entries.
View:Archive.
View:Friends.
View:Profile.
View:Website (pattib.org).