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[icon] The Power of Vitamin D-- anyone familiar? - Patti
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Subject:The Power of Vitamin D-- anyone familiar?
Time:02:48 am
I just finished the book The Power of Vitamin D, by Dr. Sarfraz Zaidi. I found it to be an interesting read, but I'm not entirely certain what to think of it-- I'm having trouble finding balanced opinions of his work.

His arguments are compelling. Most people are significantly deficient in vitamin D, which is something that I've heard from many sources (including my own physician.) Vitamin D is a hormone that is vital to quite a few metabolic processes, and deficiency can have some fairly nasty repercussions. I'm not a biochemist, but his arguments feel relatively sound to me. It's consistent with other material that I've read about the topic.

On the other hand, his book has more than a whiff of quackery about it. Whenever I see one thing promoted as the miracle cure for a variety of ailments, I get suspicious. When the author says that (some set of people) don't want you to know about this because (whatever reason, usually because it cuts into their profits), I raise a very skeptical eyebrow. When the author has his own line of products to sell you, complete with his smiling mug on the labels, I pretty much call bullshit on the whole thing. Dr. Zaidi scores a bullshit bingo here.

Even with all of the red flags, his book feels to me like it's probably more true than false.

Anyone have information on this?


Also, I really wish it was possible to just waltz into a lab and order your own bloodwork.
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dangerpudding
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Time:2012-03-07 10:52 am (UTC)
Also, I really wish it was possible to just waltz into a lab and order your own bloodwork.

It kinda is.. http://directlabs.com/
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clutch_c
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Time:2012-03-07 01:00 pm (UTC)
The $39 Vitamin D test at that site is a good deal. My local direct access lab charged over twice that IIRC.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-03-07 07:35 pm (UTC)
When the exact test that you want is the one that's on sale, the universe is speaking to you.
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whipartist
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Time:2012-03-07 06:06 pm (UTC)
Learn something new every day.
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whipartist
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Time:2012-03-07 11:26 pm (UTC)
And just a few hours after reading this, the vampires have a vial of my blood. And I have a new tool, albeit an expensive one.
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schmengie
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Time:2012-03-07 12:05 pm (UTC)
well i never read the book, but my MD told me I was D deficient around 6 months ago and I take a daily supplement now...i didnt notice the deficiency or any change since taking...
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clutch_c
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-03-07 12:52 pm (UTC)
http://www.healthtestingcenters.com/blood-testing-oakland-ca.aspx

Eg lipid panel $39
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backtobaseball
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Time:2012-03-07 12:59 pm (UTC)
For a totally non-quack perspective on Vitamin D, try _The Vitamin D Solution: A 3-Step Strategy to Cure Our Most Common Health Problems_ by Dr. Michael F. Holick, PhD, MD, who discovered the active form of vitamin D 40 years ago, and has continued to research vitamin D ever since.

The subtitle of Dr. Holick's book suggests some consonance with what you report from Dr. Zaidi.

Dr. Holick highly recommend sunlight as a source of vitamin D, because, in part, research at his lab has identified several additional beneficial substances that are formed by exposure to sunlight.

If you do manage to find a way to monitor your vitamin D level, you should target at least 50ng/ml. That's the level at which osteoporosis pretty much never occurs, as can be seen, for example, in a chart in the infamous Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of 2010.

The IOM recommended supplementing 200 IU/day, which is totally wrong-headed since vitamin D requirements vary highly across individuals -- those with sufficient sunlight require none, while some require much more -- and even for an individual, it varies by season. Thanks to ongoing monitoring, I have found that I need 3000 IU/day during the winter, but zero (0) during the summer.

One important thing about vitamin D supplementation: some sources are unreliable. See for example the first comment to http://emergentfool.com/2010/11/13/sunlight-vs-vitamin-d/
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adbjupe
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Time:2012-03-07 01:16 pm (UTC)
One of the things I noticed when I moved to the US was the amount of vitamin supplements that are taken. Way more than in Germany. The only explanation I had was the suggestive power of advertising and common belief systems. I haven't done any hard research on the issue, this is just my personal opinion.

I do have a little bit more insight on the vitamin D issue, since lack of vitamin D is blamed for the effects of psoriasis, but it's not the cause. And at the same time the lack of vitamin D was blamed for many signs of severe malnutrition, as seen in the worlds hunger zones, but not in the US or in Germany.

Thus, I have no choice but to look for a conspiracy who just wants to sell more vitamins. In this case vitamin D, since that market seems still small for a reason: To much vitamin D is dangerous. Google gives some answers in that direction.
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catness
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Time:2012-03-07 05:25 pm (UTC)
I don't know anything about the book, but my endocrinologist put me on Vitamin D supplements 3 years ago because of my crazy labs after the full body cramping incident that sent me to the ER. Mostly it was because my calcium was an issue and they wanted the Vitamin D to help me process that better. For a long time I believed it was keeping the cramp situation at bay and then a few months later I got smacked back into reality and a whole new slew of tests. I spent about 8 months pumping myself full of prescribed vitamins and then I lost interest/was getting too overloaded with the constant maintenance of keeping 16 pills a day organized. My nails grew really fast but it didn't change my symptoms or my depression after a physical event.

Since late January I've avoided taking anything but the occasional Tylenol PM. I haven't had an event that caused screaming screaming screaming since October 15 & 16, after which my neuro-muscular specialist told me I had to stop boosting calcium or it could kill me. Now I overdose on high fruit content juices for a couple of days before every physical exertion (like a gig or going for a walk) and hope that's enough.

I don't know for sure yet, but signs are pointing to the fact that extraordinarily rigid control of diet might be just as effective as supplements, at least for me.

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x_mass
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Time:2012-03-07 06:35 pm (UTC)
if your going to use vitamin d use d3 but generally speaking sunlight on bare skin should make all you need
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whipartist
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Time:2012-03-07 06:43 pm (UTC)
I've seen conflicting claims about the sunlight on bare skin assertion. It seems that's less true in older people, people with darker skin, people in northern climes, or people in urban areas. Apparently 15 minutes per day is not enough for most people.
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x_mass
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Time:2012-03-08 05:19 am (UTC)
i would be surprised if just 15 mins is enough.

the amount of hear-say and really bad science that goes on in this area is legion

It's like the one where most of your body heat is lost through the head, which if you read the original study is true: they found that (i think it was airmen) lost most of their heat from their uncovered heads because the rest of the body was insulated with thick clothing.

had a quick look at the chochrane reports http://www.thecochranelibrary.com/view/0/index.html regarding vitamin D and their was nothing in the the title list that directly compared the two mechanisms but if I was to study more about vitamin D I would start there

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[icon] The Power of Vitamin D-- anyone familiar? - Patti
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