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[icon] No more running for a while - Patti
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Subject:No more running for a while
Time:01:39 am
I just got back from the gym, where I forced my way through W6D3. However, I'm going to quit running for a while. I don't think it will be very long pause, but the big monolithic runs are wiping me out in a way that doesn't feel entirely healthy to me. I'm pretty sure it's another round of low blood pressure. I get light-headed as soon as I get off the treadmill, and I wind up spending five or ten minutes sitting on a bench before I can even make my way to the locker room.

So, in the interest of trusting my intuition and not doing stupid shit, I'm going to quit running until I can have a chat with my doctor about this, or more precisely until I can do something about it. That probably only means four or five days, maybe a week. And I might not even call a complete halt to it, but if I feel like running before this gets sorted out I'll go back and do an easier day, maybe my old friend week 4.

Once we deal with the issue, my plan is to repeat week 5. If the 20-minute run at the end feels OK, I'll skip over week 6 and start in on week 7. Repeating week 5 will let me work my way up to the monolithic runs, and let me test the waters to see if I feel better.

This feels like a reasonable and sane plan to me. Anyone have opinions?


Tonight's rationalizations were same-old. "Dude, you did ten minutes the other day. You can do at least that much now." "Hey, two and a half minutes and you're halfway there." "OK, fine, just go to 15 minutes then quit if you want to." "Hey, 60%. And you did 20 minutes the other day. You can do it again." "OK, five minutes left. No fucking way are you quitting now... do you want to have to do it again? Didn't think so." And then I counted down the last five minutes, and reminded myself that the small amount I had left was easy. It wasn't, of course.
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(Deleted comment)
loser_variable
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 04:56 pm (UTC)
Bah. The only difference between us when we run 5 miles is that you kick a ball a dozen times along the way.
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bittercrackbaby
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 11:00 am (UTC)
wrist bp monitor sounds useful to log.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 06:31 pm (UTC)
I have one. It's hopelessly inaccurate.
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cork_dork
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 11:55 am (UTC)
One of the advantages of running outdoors, rather than on a treadmill, is that you can make your route a loop. About halfway out, it becomes easier to finish the run rather than to give up and turn back.

That being said, if you're becoming light-headed after a 20 minute run, I'd say let it go for a while -- that's not a good thing, so see your doctor. Oh, and I'd advise to step yourself back a week or so when you begin again, too, as you'll lose some of the conditioning that you got during the last 5 weeks rather quickly.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 06:33 pm (UTC)
Yeah, and the problem is that I'll never get halfway if I run outdoors-- I hate it too bloody much.
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bellaballanda
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 01:16 pm (UTC)
Sounds like a sane plan... but I'm sure you knew that already....
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slfisher
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 01:42 pm (UTC)
Well, rather than stop completely, I'd back off to a level you find comfortable until you see your doctor. Since you asked for advice.
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bldrnrpdx
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 04:03 pm (UTC)
This is what I was thinking too - at the least, try to keep up walking, possibly with very short runs if they feel right.
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jcdill
Subject:Ditto
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 07:31 pm (UTC)
I n'th this advice. Keep up the exercise schedule even if it means just walking for 30 minutes instead of running. After breaking the habit it's much harder to get restarted.

If I were in your position Patti, I'd roll back to one of the earlier weeks when you ran in ~5 minute legs, and see how that works out.

Factoid: it takes about the same amount of calories to walk 5 miles as it does to run 5 miles. When you run you just do it *faster*. The reason it takes about the same amount of calories is simple physics - it takes a certain amount of energy to move a given mass a given distance, and time doesn't matter. So when you have a medical reason that interferes with going faster, just go the same distance slower. (Assuming your doctor OKs any exercise at all.)

This is one reason so many doctors recommend walking for exercise - it's safe to do even with many medical conditions that preclude more strenuous exercise.
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greeklady
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 06:07 pm (UTC)
Agreed. Once you have a great habit it doesn't take a long time to lose it especially when it comes to exercise. I'd step it down not stop it and talk to the doctor.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 06:36 pm (UTC)
It's actually a matter of picking up the phone and calling him on Monday or Tuesday, rather than seeing him. Since I have an appointment mid-month already, the conversation will go, "Dude, here's what's happening. Can I quit taking this stuff?" And he'll almost certainly say yes, and then we'll check it when I come in to see if that's OK.

I'd get a stern lecture if I did it without talking to him first, though.

In practice, that means stopping for like maybe two days longer than I normally would.
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gunga_galunga
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-03 07:53 am (UTC)
You put more stock in Drs. than I do. I'd just stop taking the BP medication and monitor it for a few days, if it goes up past 130/90 I'd start taking it again, if not I wouldn't. But then again, I go to the Dr. about once ever 5 years, if that often.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-03 08:31 am (UTC)
I've been seeing this particular doctor for close to 15 years, and I have a very good relationship with him. I'm perfectly happy to do it on his terms (which means calling him and asking permission) rather than doing it myself, simply to maintain a certain level of trust.
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loser_variable
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 04:54 pm (UTC)
Couple thoughts: Mild dizziness after exertion is fairly common, if not maybe "normal." Happens to me every now and again.

I would encourage you to stick with it at whatever level is reasonable if at all possible. It's real easy to fall off the exercise wagon, particularly after a milestone such as an annual visit to the doctor. Once you stop it's easy for a week off to become a month off, etc. Consistency is the most important thing, more than time, distance, etc.

You're not there yet, but at some point it gets to be like going to work or sleeping - just something you do every day as a matter of course. For me, I consider training my finest leisure time. But that didn't come right away.
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violet_tigress1
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-02 06:53 pm (UTC)
My opinion is that if you're feeling lightheaded, it's a good time to stop.
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frogpyjamas
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-03 09:46 am (UTC)
Yikes, sounds like you are making the right decision to pause.

I'm primarily an outdoor jogger, but I've found on the rare occasion I jog indoors on a treadmill I set the rate too fast for my body and enough endorphins don't kick in. Do you think your speed might be a factor?
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-03 09:55 am (UTC)
Can you say 17-minute miles?

One of the reasons I prefer the treadmill is that it lets me keep my speed down. I'm sure I was running way too fast when I tried doing it outside.
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slowjoe
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-04 11:56 am (UTC)
I'm sure you've thought of most of the following, but anyway...

I'd not be eager to skip a week in the program in general.

Is it only the 20 minute run that caused a problem? If so, assuming that the program on http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml is the same one you are doing, skipping week 6 looks doubly painful.

One other thing that might be a factor on the longer run is fuel. Have you tried sipping an isotonic drink during the run?

How goal directed towards the 5k are you atm? Will you keep on running afterwards?

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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2010-01-04 01:02 pm (UTC)
I've already finished all of week 6, including the 25-minute run at the end. Technically, I wouldn't be skipping it.

So I have two competing hypotheses at the moment. One is that my blood pressure is too low, and that's wiping me out. The other is that I'm really not quite ready for 20+ minute runs, and so they're wiping me out. Fuel is a third option, thanks! I think it's a longshot, though, compared to the other two.


If the problem is blood pressure, then solving that problem (by no longer taking high blood pressure medicine, presumably) should make the monolithic runs easier. I can prove this to myself by repeating W5-- if I can do the 20-minute run at the end comfortably, there's no reason I can't do 25, so I can just pick up where I left off and start W7.

If the problem is that I'm not ready for the big runs yet, then repeating W5 at least once then doing W6 again makes more sense.


The blood pressure theory still feels best to me, but the second one is gaining some momentum. Of course, it's entirely possible that it's a combination of the two, or some other factor entirely.
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[icon] No more running for a while - Patti
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