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[icon] More lighting help - Patti
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Subject:More lighting help
Time:01:33 am
So I did the stage lights thing in my living room. I bought a lighting truss that looks like this:



The truss is about ten feet wide, and I have it at about eight feet off the ground right now. I put four of these on it, only with LED bulbs rather than the crappy incandescent one shown:



(Those are totally not to scale, BTW.)

It worked out pretty well, only there's one thing I can't figure out-- how to get power to it. Each of the cans has a standard three-pin power plug on a 4' (I think) cord. I need to figure out some way to get power from the outlet to the fixtures. I can think of a few options:

Lots of extension cords. It's workable, but it seems sloppy.

Mount some sort of power strip. I found this power strip at a hardware store today. It's pretty close to being right for the job, except that it needs a longer cord. I have no doubt that I can find something similar with a longer cord, though.

Get a stringer extension cord. The cheapest one I can find is this one, which seems like it will do the job. It feels like it might be overkill, but I haven't found a lighter-weight solution.

Find some other magic gizmo. It seems like this has to be a well-solved problem, but I really haven't been able to ferret out what the standard solution is.

I don't really care about having separate control over individual lights, though ideally I would like to have them in two separate sets. I have two of the lights pointed up at the ceiling as soft ambient lights, and two pointed down for more direct lights. (I'll probably add one more of each at some point.)

Anyone know what the magic answer is?
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rightkindofme
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Time:2012-10-01 11:13 am (UTC)
I used to work on theatre lighting. In my experience there isn't really a right cord set up but cable ties make the process more tidy.
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dd_b
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Time:2012-10-01 03:45 pm (UTC)
Mmmmm, cable ties! (Lot of those behind my computer desk, too; used to be four computers up on the shelf over that.)
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whipartist
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Time:2012-10-01 05:04 pm (UTC)
Each of the el-cheapo cans came with a really spiffy velcro cable strap.
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dd_b
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Time:2012-10-01 03:44 pm (UTC)
Hey, putting the living room to work for something productive! I took lights down a couple weeks ago, but the background stand is still there (and the lights not far away).

You've got four instruments, and are looking at power solutions to handle MANY more. So I'm not understanding some requirement here.

I'd be inclined to mount two or three fairly ordinary power strips, evenly spaced across the overhead, which should give me one within 3 feet of any likely light position, and cost not very much. (With LED bulbs you're not worried about the whole thing drawing more than one wall plug, right? That was a big concern for a lot of my life :-) .)

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whipartist
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Time:2012-10-01 05:15 pm (UTC)
The bulbs are like 17W each, so power is definitely not a concern. The whole thing is about a 75W light bulb right now, and if I add two more lights it'll be approximately a 100W bulb.

The requirement that you're probably not understanding is that I can't quite make all of the power cords get to one central location. Two power strips will work, though I'll have to find them in black with 15' power cords. A single long strip would be tidier, but not horribly so.

And no, nothing productive. These are just unconventional lamps for the living room.
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adbjupe
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Time:2012-10-01 04:56 pm (UTC)
Mount two standard power strips with a switch to the wall at around 8 feet height, well within arm reach. Run a cable duct from there to the nearest outlet. Supply power to your lights with zip tied extension cords. Hide the excess cable in the cable duct.(I wouldn't try to mount a power strip on the truss)

However, the entire construction can look ugly pretty quick, but it's not to complex to get an electrician doing it at a reasonable price.
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whipartist
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-10-01 05:16 pm (UTC)
What's the reason for mounting them to the wall rather than the truss? I can snake power cords up the truss and make them nearly invisible, while a couple of power strips stuck to the wall will really stand out. Plus, I can move the whole thing just by unplugging it.
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adbjupe
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Time:2012-10-01 06:06 pm (UTC)
My expectation that it will look ugly. Having one or two power strips dangling on the truss just doesn't feel right. But it is of course a judgement call.

My street creds: I got my certificate as an electrician, then I finished the equivalent of high school. Made extra money during college breaks wiring factory halls and switching cabinets.

Relevant experience from this work: If you don't have the patience or time to make it look nice, put it in a duct or cabinet and put a lid on it.
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evwhore
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-10-02 06:28 am (UTC)
I suspect Amazon does HTTP-Referer checks or something because I don't see any images. (I looked at the entry HTML source)
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[icon] More lighting help - Patti
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